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Homemade Buttermilk Biscuits

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Homemade buttermilk biscuits are a simple yet classic way to add a touch of Southern comfort food to your weekend. 

Homemade buttermilk biscuits made from scratch are an easy way to add a touch of Southern flare to any meal.

These biscuits are super simple to make and only take less than thirty minutes from start to finish. They turn out flaky, tender, and full of butter flavor.

Top homemade buttermilk biscuits with your favorite sausage gravy, jam, or preserves to for a great brunch option. They also make a great breakfast sandwich.

Just add your favorite meat, cheese, and eggs.

Be sure to give these a try! You’ll be shocked at how easy they are to make!

Pile of homemade buttermilk biscuits on cast iron.

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 450 degrees and prepare a baking sheet or cast iron skillet.

Mix the flour, baking powder, and salt together in a large bowl or food processor.

Flour, baking powder, salt, and butter needed for homemade buttermilk biscuits in a food processor.

Add the butter and use a pastry cutter to cut the butter into the dry ingredients.

If using a food processor, pulse a few times until the mixture looks like a course cornmeal.

Ariel view of Homemade Buttermilk Biscuit ingredients mixed in a food processor.

Slowly add part of the buttermilk to the mixture and combine. Add additional buttermilk until the mixture becomes tacky and shaggy.

Remove the dough from the bowl or food processor and place on a well-floured surface.

Homemade Buttermilk Biscuit dough in a food processor.

Shape the dough into a rectangle about an inch thick. Fold the dough in half over itself and pat gently.

Reshape the dough and repeat the process four to five more times. Add additional flour to the work surface as needed. (This process creates the flaky layers!)

Use a biscuit cutter to cut out the biscuits and place the dough onto the baking sheet or cast iron.

Ariel view of uncooked homemade buttermilk biscuit dough on cast iron.

Bake the biscuits for 8 to 10 minutes or until the tops are lightly browned.

Remove from the oven and brush with melted butter.

Stack of fluffy homemade buttermilk biscuits.

Tips for Great Homemade Buttermilk Biscuits:

  • Cut the butter into small cubes and place in the freezer about 10 minutes prior to starting the recipe. The butter needs to be SUPER cold!
  • If using a food processor, don’t over pulse the butter. The motor generates heat, and the butter may get too warm.
  • When patting and folding the dough, don’t touch it too much or overwork it. This could cause the biscuits to become hard and dense.
  • When cutting the biscuits, DON’T twist the biscuit cutter. Twisting will cause the sides of the biscuit to crimp closed, and the biscuits won’t rise as well.

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Yield: 6 Servings

Homemade Buttermilk Biscuits

Pile of homemade buttermilk biscuits on cast iron.

Homemade buttermilk biscuits - simple, flaky, tender, and full of buttery goodness. A Southern staple, perfect for any weekend breakfast.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups All-Purpose flour
  • 1 Tablespoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 8 Tablespoon unsalted butter, (very cold)
  • 3/4 cup - 1 cup buttermilk, (varies depending on how wet or dry the dough is)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees and prepare a baking sheet.
  2. In a large bowl, combine flour, baking powder, and salt. (See instructions in post for using a food processor.)
  3. With a pastry cutter, mix in butter until well combined. Flour mixture will resemble a coarse cornmeal.
  4. Add buttermilk and using a metal spoon combine well with flour and butter mixture. The dough will look shaggy and be sticky.
  5. Remove dough from bowl and place on a well-floured surface. Pat into a flat rectangle.
  6. Fold in half on top of itself and pat flat again.
  7. Repeat this step 4 to 5 times.
  8. Shape dough into a rectangular shape about 1/2 inch to an inch thick.
  9. Use a biscuit cutter and press down firmly. Do not twist.
  10. Place biscuits on prepared baking sheet or silicone baking mat.
  11. Place in oven for 8 to 10 minutes or until golden brown.
  12. Enjoy with your favorite jams, jellies, or honey!

Notes

I've recently added an adjustment to the buttermilk measurement. Depending on the humidity and altitude where you live, the amount of liquid required may vary. Start with the smaller amount and add more as needed.

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Nutrition Information:

Yield: 6 Serving Size: 1 grams
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 306Total Fat: 16gSaturated Fat: 10gUnsaturated Fat: 0gCholesterol: 43mgSodium: 229mgCarbohydrates: 34gFiber: 1gSugar: 1gProtein: 5g

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Chandra

Thursday 21st of July 2016

Hello, i am going to try these scones, i would like to know what does 8 tablespoons butter equate to in grams.

Thanks

Kimberly

Thursday 21st of July 2016

Hi, Chandra! 8 Tablespoons of butter equals 115 grams. Great question!

Murray Brigham

Monday 30th of May 2016

Thanks Kimberly for a great recipe, and more importantly, your tip on why 'not to twist your biscuit cutter' when cutting your biscuits. I've read many recipes that tell you not to twist, but never tell why.